Saturday, December 12, 2009

US Flow of Funds: wealth recovery fully underway, China?

This week the Federal Reserve reported the Q3 2009 Flow of Funds accounts. The headline indicators show household net worth improving and private debt burden falling.

The private sector - households and firms - is dropping leverage.

Update: This chart has been modified slightly - the leverage level data (highlighted in blue, red, and green) has been updated.
Either by default or by growing saving, the private sector is de-leveraging. According to the D.1 table, households and nonfinancial businesses dropped debt a further 2.6% q/q annualized, while financial sector debt fell another 9.3%. However, total debt (of the domestic nonfinancial sector) grew 2.8%, as the federal and state and local governments grew debt 20.1% and 5.1%, respectively.

Household wealth grew $2.7 billion trillion for a cumulative gain of $4.9 billion trillion since wealth hit a cyclical low in Q1 2009. To put this gain in perspective, household net-worth dropped $17.5 billion trillion from Q3 2007 to Q1 2009, 3.5 x the recent gain. Wealth to disposable income, a statistically significant factor of the personal saving rate, rests right around it long-term (1952-1007) average, 4.9.

The chart illustrates the wealth-effect as the ratio of net-worth to disposable income. The direct and adverse impact of the wealth loss on consumption probably peaked last quarter; however, the lagged effects are ongoing.

Notice that the ratio shifted discretely in the 1990's, not coincidentally when China's current account surplus took off.

Most likely, the wealth to personal income ratio has mean-reverted, and will not rise back to its 5.7 1997-2007 average. A necessary condition is that global portfolio flows rebalance - i.e., China saves less and the US saves more. However, this will not happen tomorrow - de-leveraging is a process that takes years. The increase in international saving (i.e., falling current account deficits) will take some time, and by definition includes the general government eventually dropping its debt burden. Not to mention the political rhetoric and growing trade barriers suggest that a long-term economic shift is a ways off.

Rebecca Wilder

1 comment:

  1. Since congress just gave itself a Christmas "pork" gift, how will the debt burden drop? Their rational that the savings from Medicare changes will pay for other medical coverage is flawed so whatever else they come up with will probably be flawed, too. Ergo, not much debt will go away.

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